Specialization in Strategy and Organizational Design

If you would like to specialize in Strategy and Organizational Design, you may want to take many of the courses offered by our department. These will either be part of the core programme (e.g. ARTM), or the elective programme (as part of Topics in Strategy and Innovation 1/2/3). At present, we foresee that we will offer the following courses on a regular basis (i.e. each topic will be offered at least once every three semesters).


Applying Advanced Regression Techniques in Management (ARTM)

Recommendation for attending this course:

• Successful attendance of the course Econometrics, or in-depth knowledge of the contents of that course.

Contents:

This course seeks to complement “Multivariate Business Statistics” for PhD students in three distinct ways.

1. It will introduce to more complex limited dependent variable problems

2. It will introduce to the analysis of panel data

3. It will introduce to programming with one of the most powerful software tools in econometrics, namely STATA.

This course seeks also to complement “Econometrics” for PhD students in another important way. Namely,

4. the course will offer you an additional opportunity to become ever more familiar with the “hands on” application of both basic and more advanced regression techniques for your own research purposes.

The focus of the course is “solid application”. Hence, neither our theory sessions nor any of the exercises will be centred on mathematical proofs but rather on a proper understanding of the logic, options, and caveats of the methods we discuss.

One focus of this class will be on getting you to work on applied problems yourself. Essentially, the course will follow a “sandwich format” where front-end theory sessions, alternate with student presentations on selected research articles, and computer sessions during which we work on simulated and real data.

Selected References:

• Foss, N. J., & Laursen, K. (2005). Performance pay, delegation and multitasking under uncertainty and innovativeness: An empirical investigation. Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, 58, 2, 246-276.

• Gulati, R., & Singh, H. (1998). The Architecture of Cooperation: Managing Coordination Costs and Appropriation Concerns in Strategic Alliances. Administrative Science Quarterly, 43, 4, 781-814.

• Henkel, J. (2006). Selective revealing in open innovation processes: The case of embedded Linux. Research Policy, 35, 7, 953-969.

• Henkel, J., & Reitzig, M. (2008). Patent Sharks. Harvard Business Review, 86, 6, 129-133.

• Maddala, G. S. (1983). Limited-dependent and qualitative variables in econometrics. Cambridge [Cambridgeshire: Cambridge University Press.

• Mukherjee, A. S., Lapre, M. A., & Van Wassenhove, L. N. (1998). Knowledge Driven Quality Improvement. Management Science, 44.

• Wooldridge, J. M. (2002). Econometric analysis of cross section and panel data. Cambridge, Mass: MIT Press.

• Wooldridge, J. M. (2002). Introductory econometrics: A modern approach. Princeton, N.J.

Basic Readings in Business (BRB)

Contents:

• More information to follow shortly

Selected references:

• More information to follow shortly

Organizational Behavior for Strategy and Organizational Design (OBSO)

Contents:

More information to follow shortly.

Selected references:

More information to follow shortly.

Simulation Methods for Strategy and Organizational Design (SMSO)

Recommendation for attending this course:

• Successful attendance of MDM, MC, SC

Contents:

Computational modeling is an increasingly significant approach to theory development in management and economics. In general, simulations are commonly used for studying adaptive and evolutionary dynamics. However, they also have proven useful for the study of discrete dynamics as approximations to closed-form solutions. Simulations are also valuable for the numerical analysis of intractable analytical problems.

The Ph.D. course offers an introduction to computational methods and simulation models in management. It aims to introduce students to the basics of computational modeling, to give an overview of canonical simulation models and to discuss the potential and limitations of simulation models for management research. The main focus is on the discussion of original research. No prior programming experience is required for the course.

Selected References:

• Denrell, J., & March, J. G. (2001). Adaptation as Information Restriction. Organization Science, 12, 5, 523-538.

• March, J. (1988). Variable risk preferences and adaptive aspirations. Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, 9, 1, 5-24.

• Arthur, W. B. (1994). Inductive Reasoning and Bounded Rationality. The American Economic Review, 84, 2, 406-411.

• Epstein, J. M., (1999). Learning to be thoughtless: Social norms and individual computation. Washington, DC: Center on Social and Economic Dynamics.

• Levinthal, D. A. (1993). Adaptation in rugged landscapes. Philadelphia, Pa: Wharton School, Snider Entrepreneurial Center.

• Rivkin, J. W., & Harvard University. (1997). Imitation of complex strategies. Boston: Division of Research, Harvard Business School.

• March, J. G. (1991). Exploration and Exploitation in Organizational Learning. Organization Science, 2, 1, 71-87.

Strategy Content (SC)

Recommendation for attending this course:

• Successful attendance of the course Theory of Networks, or in-depth knowledge of the contents of that course.

Contents:

This is a survey course ‐ an introduction to important theories of strategy. A few words about the design principles of this course:


1. Strategy research can be seen as a matrix of theories and phenomena. The structure‐conductperformance
paradigm, game theory, resource based theory, theories of organizational knowledge and
learning, transaction cost economics and evolutionary economics are all widely known and used
theoretical lenses in strategy content research. The phenomena these theories are applied to include
industry concentration, diversification, vertical integration, organization design, knowledge transfer and
management, acquisitions and alliances etc. I have consciously chosen to provide a survey organized by
theories rather than phenomena, given the importance that theory building, testing and development will
play in your future lives as academics (perhaps in the field of strategy).


2. As we typically spend about 1.5 sessions on a theoretical framework, this will hardly make you a master
of that theory. That's what a survey course is about – think of it as a trailer that gives you some sense of
the main attraction. Many of the theories we cover in one session could be the topic of a whole doctoral
seminar by themselves! The reading list for each session will give you additional "below the line"
references to readings that will point the way in terms of deepening your expertise in a particular theory.
You might also consider additional elective coursework as a means to drill deeper into a particular
theory. It is your own responsibility to do follow up work to deepen you knowledge of a theory and its
associated literature.


3. In terms of pre‐requisites, if you have taken some class that covers basic readings in management
theories (e.g. ToN, better FRB) in Vienna (or their equivalents elsewhere), you should be adequately
prepared to take this course. Contact me if you have not taken one or both of these course and are still
keen to take Strategy Content: I will suggest a supplementary reading list.

Selected References:

• Rumelt R.P., Schendel, D.E. & Teece D.J. (1994). Fundamental Issues in Strategy: A research agenda, HBS Press Boston MA, pp. 9‐47, 527‐555.

• Scherer F.M. & Ross D. (1990). "The Structure‐Conduct‐Performance Paradigm". Industrial Market Structure
and Economic Performance, Rand McNally, pp. 1‐7.

• McGahan, A, and Porter, M. (1998). 'How Much Does Industry Matter Really?' Strategic Management Journal, 18 (Summer Special Issue): 15‐30.

• White R. E. (1986). “Generic Business Strategies, Organizational Context and Performance: An Empirical
Investigation”, Strategic Management Journal, 7(3): 217‐231.

• Teece D.J. (1980). “Economies of scope and the scope of the enterprise”, Journal of Economic Behavior &
Organization, 1(3): 223‐247.

• Nelson R. & Winter S. (1982). The Evolutionary Theory of Economic Change Belknap Press of Harvard
University Press, Chapters 2, 4, 5.

• Gibbons R. (2005). “Four formal(izable) theories of the firm?”. Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, 58(2): 200‐245.

Strategy Process (SP)

Contents:

More information to follow shortly.

Selected references:

More information to follow shortly.